You are currently viewing 5 Best Electric Guitars for Fingerstyle for 2024 – Darren’s Favorites

Last Updated on March 2, 2024 by Teemu Suomala

Author: DL Shepherd

Darren has been playing guitar for over 23 years. He fronted the metal band Suddenly Silence in the early 2000’s, and also achieved recognition as an award-winning bluegrass guitarist.

A native of southwestern Virginia, and has shared the stage with many big-name acts from various genres. When he is not playing one of his many guitars, he can be found riding his Harley through the mountains of Virginia.

photo reveals owner of guitaristnextdoor.com

Editing & Research: Teemu Suomala

I first grabbed the guitar in 2009. I started this website in January 2020 because I couldn’t do window installation anymore due to my health problems. I love guitars and have played dozens and dozens of different guitars through different amps and pedals over the years, and also, building a website interested me, so I decided to just go for it! I got lucky and managed to get awesome people to help me with my website.

I also got lucky because I have you visiting my website right now. Thank you. I do all this for you guys. If you have any recommendations, tips, or feedback, just leave a comment, I would love to chat with you. I have also been fortunate to produce content for several large guitar websites, such as SongsterrMusicnotesGuitarGuitar, and Ultimate Guitar.

I spend my spare time exercising and hanging out with my wife and crazy dog (I guess that went the right way…).


Best Overall – Fender Player Stratocaster

Reviewer: DL Shepherd

Sound
Playability
Overall Quality
Value For Money
Fingerpicking feel

Summary

Pros:
-Lightweight body is great for long playing sessions
-C-shaped neck makes chording comfortable 
-Fender Player Series pickups are quiet and well balanced
-Controls allow endless tone-shaping capabilities

Cons:
-Neck radius may be a bit much for some players

Who is this guitar for?
This guitar is for players who are looking for the absolute best when it comes to a good electric guitar for fingerstyle playing. It offers amazing playability and endless tone-shaping capabilities that can only be found with a Stratocaster.

4.8

How Fender Player Stratocaster sounds:

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The Next Best:

Best for Beginners – Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster

displays Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • A comfortable C-shaped neck is playable during long sessions
  • Provides a classic Stratocaster tone at a fraction of the price
  • Controls add endless tone-shaping capabilities

Cons:

  • Hardware feels a bit cheap
  • Electronics add a little noise to the signal
  • Needs a good setup

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for anyone looking for a solid-performing first guitar for fingerstyle playing or for the seasoned player looking to add another guitar to their arsenal.

 

Best for Country – Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select 1959 Chet Atkins

displays Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select 1959 Chet Atkins

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Comfortable, smooth playing neck
  • Vintage-voiced humbuckers provide loads of creamy tone
  • Electronics allow for endless tonal options
  • Built with premium materials

Cons:

  • Can feel a bit thick compared to other electrics
  • Price may be a bit high for some players

Who is this guitar for?

The Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select Chet Atkins is a guitar for the discerning guitarist who is looking for a smooth-playing hollow body guitar to add to their collection. It is for players who want a premium guitar for fingerstyle playing.

Best For Rock – Gibson Les Paul Standard 50’s Gold Top

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Controls add tonal versatility
  • All mahogany body produces a beefy, thick tone
  • Loads of vintage styling make this guitar eye-catching
  • 50s neck profile is great for chording

Cons:

  • May be a bit heavy for long sessions
  • Can sound a bit bassy when played with the fingers

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for any fingerstyle player looking to have a thick tone for rock music.

Best for Blues/Jazz – Ibanez Artcore Expressionist AG95QA Hollowbody

displays Ibanez Artcore Expressionist AG95QA Hollowbody

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Ash body is lightweight for comfort
  • The neck is one of the most comfortable we’ve played
  • Super 58 pickups are great played clean or with overdrive
  • Looks absolutely incredible

Cons:

  • Feels a bit wide to some players
  • The neck may be too thin for those who prefer a thick neck

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for any fingerstyle guitarist looking to delve into the blues or jazz scene. It is an incredible tone machine.

Compare The Key Specs:

graphic compares 5 Best Electric Guitars for Fingerstyle

About Fingerstyle Electrics

If you’ve ever heard The Dire Straits “Sultans of Swing” come on the radio while in the car or in the grocery store (and let’s face it, who hasn’t?), then you have heard one of the best fingerstyle electric guitar players on the planet. 

Those sweet riffs and solos come from the fingers of Mark Knopfler. His sound is smooth and articulate – something you can only achieve by playing an electric guitar without a pick. 

While it is not the most popular style of electric guitar playing, learning fingerstyle guitar opens up new doors for guitarists. A completely different palette of sounds is available depending on how it is played. It is the most intimate way to play, and every note is an extension of the player’s own bare fingers. 

There are some guitars that are better than others for fingerstyle guitarists. Let’s take a look at the 5 best electric guitars for fingerstyle playing. Stretch out those fingers, folks. You’re going to need them.

Check our other sweet guides for fingerstyle lovers!

Best Acoustic Guitars for Fingerstyle in 2023

35 Easy Fingerpicking Songs


Our Reviews of The Top 5

Keep These 3 Key Things In Mind When Choosing:

Best Overall – Fender Player Stratocaster

Specs

Body StyleStratocaster
Body WoodAlder
NeckMaple
Neck ShapeModern C
Fretboard22, Medium Jumbo frets.
Maple fingerboard. 9.5″ radius.
NutSynthetic Bone nut
Nut Width1.650″
Pickups3 x Player Series Alnico V Strat Single-coil
Controls1 x master volume
2 x tone control
5-way blade pickup switch
Scale-Length25.5″
Bridge2-piece Synchronized Tremolo with Bent Steel Saddles
TunersFender Standard Cast/Sealed

If you’re wanting the best electric guitar for fingerstyle playing, then the Fender Player Stratocaster is hard to beat. The Fender Stratocaster has been a favorite of fingerstyle players such as Jeff Beck and Mark Knopfler for many years, and for good reason. 

It starts with a solid alder body, maple neck, and single-coils. This combination has been a tried a true recipe for that classic Stratocaster sound for decades. The neck has a modern C-shape as well which makes chording comfortable and effortless. It is topped off with 22 medium-jumbo frets that only add to the playability. The neck fits well with my large hands and with the smaller mitts of Teemu too (our editor).

Check our picks for the best electric guitars for small hands here.

The Fender Player Strat is equipped with 3 Fender Player Series Alnico V pickups for that classic Strat sound. These are great for fingerstyle playing because they control the midrange and bass very well while adding a bit of high-end. When played with the fingers, they create a  very warm and balanced tone that is simply stunning. 

Players can shape their tone even further with the single volume control and dual tone controls. A 5-way blade switch allows you to switch between pickups and their reverse polarities creating an extremely wide tonal palette. If you like to play around with your tone, this is the guitar for you. 

It has a tremolo bridge for those that want to add a bit of vibrato to their soloing, and chrome hardware is standard for that classic appearance. It’s available in a wide variety of colors as well so you can really express your style. 

I’m partial to the Capri Orange myself. Jeff Beck plays a white Stratocaster in this performance (another fingerstyle king). 

If you want to nail that Knopfler tone, this is the guitar to do it! It is a tried and true guitar that can produce an incredible array of tones and sounds amazing when played fingerstyle. 

Try it out and you’ll see what we’re talking about.

The Fender Player Stratocaster has it all when it comes to incredible fingerstyle tone and playability. It has been a favorite of famous fingerstyle players for decades.

Another solid sound demo:

Pros:

  • A lightweight body is great for long playing sessions
  • C-shaped neck makes chording comfortable 
  • Fender Player Series pickups are quiet and well balanced
  • Controls allow endless tone-shaping capabilities

Cons:

  • Neck radius may be a bit much for some players
What others are saying:

The finish is flawless, the neck is smooth and makes fast playing feel effortless. The alnico pickups give off a nice chimy tone that is a huge selling point for me when it comes to Stratocasters.” – Rob, Sweetwater customer

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for players who are looking for the absolute best when it comes to a good electric guitar for fingerstyle playing. It offers amazing playability and endless tone-shaping capabilities that can only be found with a Stratocaster.

Who is this guitar NOT for?

This guitar is not for those players who are fans of big, beefy tones. The single-coil pickups just weren’t designed for that.

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Best for Beginners – Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster

displays Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster

Specs

Body StyleStratocaster
Body WoodPoplar
NeckMaple
Neck ShapeC
Fretboard21 Medium Jumbo frets.
Maple fingerboard. 9.5″ radius.
NutSynthetic Bone nut
Nut Width1.650″
Pickups3 x Ceramic Single-coil
Controls1 x master volume
2 x tone control
5-way blade pickup switch
Scale-Length25.5″
Bridge2-Point Synchronized Tremolo with Block Saddles
TunersSealed Die-cast

If you’re wanting a Stratocaster but don’t want to drop that much money into a Fender Player Stratocaster, then the Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster is the next best thing. Trust me, you won’t be losing too much if you go with it. It’s one of the best values in the music industry.

 It packs a lot of value into a Stratocaster. It is made with a poplar body, a maple neck, and a laurel fingerboard. This combination is very close to the alder/maple combination of the Fender player strat. Poplar is just a little softer than alder but the tonal characteristics are close. 

The neck is a modern C-shape and quite comfortable to play for long sessions. It is certainly comfortable enough for a beginner who is just starting their guitar journey. The frets are medium jumbo frets allowing for easy chording. I actually prefer the fretboard radius to that of the Fender Stratocaster which feels a bit too round for my tastes. The Squier is not as extreme. 

There’s a chrome tremolo bridge and tuners that look classy. However, they feel a little cheaper than its more expensive Fender counterpart. The pickups provide a nice smooth tone. I noticed a bit of noise in mine, but at this price, you can’t expect them to be completely flawless. 

The Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster is a great option for those who don’t want to pull the trigger on a Fender Stratocaster, and it is a proven performer for finger-style players.

If you’re wanting a budget-friendly guitar that plays and sounds close to a real Fender Stratocaster, then the Squier Affinity Series Stratocaster is the one you want to get. It is great for beginners as well as seasoned players looking for another guitar to add to their arsenal.

How this Affinity Strat sounds compares to Fender Strat:

Pros:

  • A comfortable C-shaped neck is playable during long sessions
  • Provides a classic Stratocaster tone at a fraction of the price
  • Controls add endless tone-shaping capabilities

Cons:

  • Hardware feels a bit cheap
  • Electronics add a little noise to the signal
  • Needs a good setup
What others are saying:

Forget what you think you know about Squier Affinity guitars. The re-voiced pickups are a great improvement. The fit and finish is first rate. And maybe I got lucky, but there are NO sharp frets on this guitar. That’s pretty unusual on a sub 400.00 instrument. It’s not the equal of an American Strat, but it doesn’t cost nearly as much.” – Thad, Sweetwater customer

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for anyone looking for a solid-performing first guitar for fingerstyle playing or for the seasoned player looking to add another guitar to their arsenal.

Who is this guitar NOT for?

This guitar is not for someone looking for a perfect setup out of the box. They typically take a little adjusting to get them dialed in.

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Best for Country – Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select 1959 Chet Atkins

displays Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select 1959 Chet Atkins

Specs

Body StyleHollowbody Single-cut
Top MaterialLaminated Maple
Body WoodLaminated Maple
NeckMaple
Neck ShapeVintage V
Fretboard22 Vintage Small frets.
Ebony fingerboard. 12″ radius.
NutBone nut
Nut Width1.6875″
Pickups2 x TV Jones Classic Humbucker
Controls2 x volume (neck/bridge)
1 x master volume
3-position master tone switch
3-way toggle pickup switch
Scale-Length24.6″
BridgeRocking Bar Bridge with Pinned Ebony Base, Bigsby B6C Vibrato Tailpiece
TunersGrover Sta-Tite Open Gear

Chet Atkins is one of the best fingerstyle players of all time, and he knew what to look for in a good electric guitar. Just listen to “Mr. Sandman” from 1954 and you’ll see why he’s one of the best. His style was smooth and fluid, and he used his thumb to thump out a rhythm while playing the lead with his middle and index fingers. 

If you are fascinated by “Mr. Guitar”, then you’ll love the Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select 1958 Chet Atkins. It is definitely a guitar that is worth his name. 

It has a hollow maple body and a maple neck capped by a beautiful ebony fretboard. The all-maple construction results in a very bright and snappy tone – a tone that helped make Chet Atkins well known. It is a guitar that is oozing with vintage style, and that’s not a bad thing!

This “big box” guitar is a tone machine. The electronics start with vintage-voiced TV Jones classic humbuckers for a smooth, creamy tone that is well-balanced and precise. They provide more bass than single-coil pickups and sound much fuller while retaining brightness. 

One of the more interesting things about the Gretsch G6120T-59 is the 2-volume/1-tone control setup. This allows the player to dial in the tone by balancing the output of each pickup. Once you’re dialed in, you can use the master volume to control the overall projection. This makes it a very versatile guitar that can go from quiet to raging with the simple turn of a knob. 

A Bigsby tremolo allows players to add subtle vibrato to their soloing. It is very responsive and does not require much effort to operate. It is certainly easier to operate than a Stratocaster tremolo which feels stiff in comparison. 

The fit and finish are excellent, and there are no sharp edges on the guitar at all. The hardware is premium (as it should be on a guitar of this caliber), and the neck plays wonderfully even when doing some of the complex chords that Mr. Atkins loved to play. 

If you’re wanting a premium guitar that is a proven fingerstyle performer, then the Gretsch G6129T-59 is the guitar that you want to grab.

The Gretsch G6120T-59 is a historically accurate reproduction of Chet Atkins’ hollow-body guitar. If you’re up for some fancy fingerpicking and want a premium guitar, this is it.

How this guitar sounds:

Pros:

  • Comfortable, smooth playing neck
  • Vintage-voiced humbuckers provide loads of creamy tone
  • Electronics allow for endless tonal options
  • Built with premium materials

Cons:

  • Can feel a bit thick compared to other electrics
  • Price may be a bit high for some players
What others are saying:

“I am a collector and this one just shines. Plays beautifully and looks terrific. You really cannot get that great Gretsch twang elsewhere but it also functions well in jazz compositions. Could not be more pleased!” – Eric, Sweetwater customer

Who is this guitar for?

The Gretsch G6120T-59 Vintage Select Chet Atkins is a guitar for the discerning guitarist who is looking for a smooth-playing hollow body guitar to add to their collection. It is for players who want a premium guitar for fingerstyle playing that sounds great with and without an amplifier.

Who is this guitar NOT for?

This guitar is not for someone with a heavy picking hand. This guitar prefers to be played a bit more lightly.

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Best For Rock – Gibson Les Paul Standard 50’s Gold Top

Specs

Body StyleLes Paul
Top MaterialMaple
Body WoodMahogany
NeckMahogany
Neck ShapeVintage ’50s
Fretboard22 Medium Jumbo frets.
Rosewood fingerboard. 12″ radius.
NutGraphTech nut
Nut Width1.695″
PickupsBurstbucker 1 Humbucker
Burstbucker 2 Humbucker
Controls2 x volume
2 x tone
3-way toggle pickup switch
Scale-Length24.75″
BridgeABR-1 Tune-O-Matic Bridge with Stopbar Tailpiece
TunersVintage Deluxe

Derrick Trucks and Mark Knopfler have both rocked a Les Paul while showing off their fingerpicking skills. It is one of the most recognizable guitars in the world, and it lends itself well to fingerstyle playing. 

The Gibson Les Paul Standard 50’s Gold Top is a classic guitar with a classic look and tone. It has a mahogany body capped with a maple top and a mahogany neck. The fretboard is rosewood. It is definitely the heaviest guitar on the list, but don’t let that deter you from trying it out. It’s a smooth-playing tone monster.

The neck has a 50s taper to it meaning that it is thicker than more modern necks. This is usually preferred by fingerstyle guitarists due to the number of chords that they play compared to single-note leads. Mark Knopfler loves the feel of a 50s-style neck. 

The pickups are Gibson Burstbuckers which dish up huge helpings of creamy, warm tone. They can be a bit bassy at times when played with the fingers, but this can usually be controlled with the 2-volume/2-tone control setup and a good equalizer. Once you find that sweet spot, you’ll be wondering why you haven’t pulled the trigger on one of these a lot sooner. 

The gold top and premium hardware scream vintage. It looks like a Les Paul straight out of the 1950s.

How much classier can you get when you have a gold guitar? Not much.

The Gibson Les Paul Standard 50s should be on your list of future guitars for fingerpicking because it is tonally versatile and offers a great neck that is comfortable for long sessions with a lot of chords.

How this guitar sounds:

Pros:

  • Controls add tonal versatility
  • All mahogany body produces a beefy, thick tone
  • Loads of vintage styling make this guitar eye-catching
  • 50s neck profile is great for chording

Cons:

  • May be a bit heavy for long sessions
  • Can sound a bit bassy when played with the fingers
What others are saying:

“This is an absolute firecracker of a guitar. The neck is incredible! Perfect weight 8lb 10oz. I guess I got lucky on that. The pickups are great, vintage sounding. The binding is flawless, and the pictures do not justify the gold color on this guitar.” – Vibhor, Sweetwater customer

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for any fingerstyle player looking to have a thick tone for rock music.

Who is this guitar NOT for?

This guitar is not for fans of lighter guitars as it can feel a bit heavy after long playing sessions.

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Best for Blues/Jazz – Ibanez Artcore Expressionist AG95QA Hollowbody

displays Ibanez Artcore Expressionist AG95QA Hollowbody

Specs

Body StyleHollowbody
Top MaterialQuilted Ash
Body WoodQuilted Ash
Neck3-piece Nyatoh/Maple
Neck ShapeAG Expressionist
Fretboard22 Medium frets.
Ebony fingerboard. 12″ radius.
NutPlastic nut
Nut Width1.692″
Pickups2 x Super 58 Alnico Humbucker
Controls2 x volume
2 x tone
3-way toggle pickup switch
Scale-Length24.7″
BridgeGibraltar Performer Bridge with VT06 Tailpiece
TunersIbanez Die-cast

While Ibanez has primarily carved their niche as a “shredder’s” guitar, they also make some great guitars for fingerstyle playing. The Ibanez Arcore Expressionist AG95QA is the best out of them all. While he isn’t a fingerstyle guitarist, George Benson loves to use his Ibanez to create some smooth jazz tones. Fingerstyle guitarists can do the same with the Ibanez AG95QA. 

The Ibanez AG95QA sports a hollow ash body, a nyatoh/maple neck, and an ebony fretboard. Ash is a superb tonewood and provides a loud, crisp sound. The electronics are the same pickups that jazz greats George Benson, Pat Metheny, and John Scofield love. They are Ibanez Super 58 humbuckers which provide a warm, flowing tone. 

The 3-way selector switch and 2-volume/2-tone controls allow it to be incredibly versatile. Turn up the volume and throw some overdrive on the signal to get a blazing blues tone that is reminiscent of BB King. 

The neck is incredibly playable for both chords and scales. It is a bit on the thinner side but retains its comfort even when playing chords for long periods of time. It is a modern feeling C-shaped neck profile that just feels right in the hand. 

The ART-1 trapeze tailpiece, body binding, and block inlays all give it a vintage vibe. The gold hardware exudes class and style that blends perfectly with the quilted top to make this guitar a real gem to look at.

If you want to look classy and sound amazing while laying down some fingerstyle licks, then the Ibanez AG95A should be your next guitar.

How this guitar sounds:

Pros:

  • Ash body is lightweight for comfort
  • The neck is one of the most comfortable we’ve played
  • Super 58 pickups are great played clean or with overdrive
  • Looks absolutely incredible

Cons:

  • Feels a bit wide to some players
  • The neck may be too thin for those who prefer a thick neck
What others are saying:

“If you want a guitar that can play just about any style of music, plays insanely well, and sounds excellent without an amp, this one is an excellent choice! 3 people played it at a local open mic night and were drooling over how awesome it plays and sounds.” – Geoffrey, Sweetwater customer

Who is this guitar for?

This guitar is for any fingerstyle guitarist looking to delve into the blues or jazz scene. It is an incredible tone machine.

Who is this guitar NOT for?

This guitar is not for a fingerstyle guitarist that prefers a thicker neck. The neck is on the thinner side.

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Runner-Ups That Just Missed The Top 5


Buyer’s Guide – FAQ

Can You Use Electric Guitar for Fingerstyle?

Absolutely. Players such as Mark Knopfler, Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, and Jeff Beck all play fingerstyle and have made it work for them. Just like anything else, it takes practice to get it down.

What You Should Know Before Buying?

First, if you are not already a fingerstyle player, realize that the fingers on your right hand are going to get really sore! 

In all seriousness, you should know that guitars with a wider string spacing and a thicker neck tend to be the best for fingerstyle playing. This is because the fingers on your right hand need a little more space in order to pluck the strings, and a thicker neck is usually more comfortable to chord for longer periods of time. The guitars on this list are all proven performers for fingerstyle playing. 

How to Choose The Right Fingerstyle Electric Guitar for You

Pickups

image reveals How different electric guitar pickups sound

Single-coils or low-output humbuckers are recommended for fingerstyle playing. This is mainly because high-gain pickups tend to amplify the sound a bit too much making the bass override the mids. Single-coils and low-output humbuckers help control this issue by being a little more mid-forward.

Body Styles

image displays Different electric guitars

Solid body, semi hollowbody, or hollow-body guitars are all good. This really depends on personal taste and style. A semi-hollow or hollow body will give a bit more tonal depth than a solid body, but a solid body tends to be more focused. Hit a music store and test different body styles, shapes, and sizes out!

Nut Width & String Spacing

photo reveals what guitar string spacing means
String spacing is in general measured from Low E to high e.

You definitely want a guitar that has some space for your fingers to pluck the strings individually. Typically, a standard Fender Stratocaster spacing is 2 1/16 (2.063) inches which is fine. 2.05” is the standard string spacing among all sorts of different guitars.

Check our full guitar nut width guide here.

Neck Shapes

This graph reveals most common guitar neck shapes

Most fingerstyle players prefer a C-shaped neck that is a bit on the thicker side. Even an older 50s style neck will be good because there is more wood there to grab. Fingerstyle playing often requires more chording with the left hand and thicker necks tend to be more comfortable for this. Learn more about guitar neck shapes in our full guide here.

Scale Length

photo reveals what is guitars scale length

Many people prefer the Fender scale length of 25.5”, but even Gibson’s 24.75” scale will work.  A shorter scale length reduces string tension and gives a looser fingerpicking feel. Which one you should choose? You should test guitars with different scale lengths and choose based on what you like the most.

What Kind of Strings You Should Use for Fingerstyle Electric Guitar?

The best strings to use would be .10s (light gauge) or even a .12. The .10s seem to work the best because the bass strings aren’t as large and therefore don’t get in the way physically or tonally. 

Is Telecaster Good for Fingerpicking?

The Telecaster is generally a good guitar for fingerpicking. It can be a bit harsh on the high end if plucked hard, but with the right volume/tone setup it can be a great fingerstyle guitar. Telecasters with humbuckers offer a bit more stable and gentle tone.

Is Fingerpicking Harder Than Strumming?

Yes. Fingerpicking is harder than strumming. Instead of using one fluid motion to play all of the strings, fingerpicking generally requires the player to play only two or three different strings without playing the others. In other words you may only play notes on the A, D, and B strings without playing notes on the E, G, and high E strings. 

It is a really fun challenge though! 

Check our favorite acoustic guitars for fingerstyle here.

Great Fingerstyle Electric Guitar Songs

Sultans of Swing” – The Dire Straits

I’ll See You In My Dreams” – Chet Atkins

Freeway Jam” – Jeff Beck

Saturday Night Shuffle” – Merle Travis


Conclusion

Playing an electric guitar fingerstyle can open up new tonal possibilities for pickers, and it can be a rewarding challenge. You can change your entire sound just by getting rid of the pick. 

Having an axe that is easy to play is an added bonus. It can save you a lot of time and frustration. There is nothing worse than getting hand cramps in the middle of a set!

While it may not be the most popular style of guitar playing today, fingerstyle electric guitar players like Mark Knopfler have brought it to the surface. It is unique and requires a bit more finesse than playing with a pick. That is what always drew me to it in the first place: a light touch that creates a huge sound. 

So take your pick from our list and give it a try for yourself! Happy picking from everyone at guitaristnextdoor.com!

DL Shepherd

Darren has been playing guitar for over 25 years and teaching guitar since High-School. He fronted the metal band Suddenly Silence in the early 2000’s, and also achieved recognition as an award-winning bluegrass guitarist. A native of southwestern Virginia, and has shared the stage with many big-name acts from various genres. When he is not playing one of his many guitars, he can be found riding his Harley through the mountains of Virginia. Expertise: teaching guitars, electric guitars, acoustic guitars, guitar amplifiers, guide pedals, flatpicking, bluegrass, metal, rock, and blues.
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Stuart

Thank you for a really great article. As a beginner, this is really useful information.

Teemu Suomala

Thank you for saying that Stuart! Hopefully you found your next fingerstyle electric guitar here!