You are currently viewing 5 Best Taylor Guitars for 2024: Top Models Worth Your Money

Last Updated on March 1, 2024 by Teemu Suomala

Author: DL Shepherd

Darren has been playing guitar for over 23 years. He fronted the metal band Suddenly Silence in the early 2000’s, and also achieved recognition as an award-winning bluegrass guitarist.

A native of southwestern Virginia, and has shared the stage with many big-name acts from various genres. When he is not playing one of his many guitars, he can be found riding his Harley through the mountains of Virginia.

photo reveals owner of guitaristnextdoor.com

Editing & Research: Teemu Suomala

I first grabbed the guitar in 2009. I started this website in January 2020 because I couldn’t do window installation anymore due to my health problems. I love guitars and have played dozens and dozens of different guitars through different amps and pedals over the years, and also, building a website interested me, so I decided to just go for it! I got lucky and managed to get awesome people to help me with my website.

I also got lucky because I have you visiting my website right now. Thank you. I do all this for you guys. If you have any recommendations, tips, or feedback, just leave a comment, I would love to chat with you. I have also been fortunate to produce content for several large guitar websites, such as SongsterrMusicnotesGuitarGuitar, and Ultimate Guitar.

I spend my spare time exercising and hanging out with my wife and crazy dog (I guess that went the right way…).

We can proudly say that Darren Shepherd has played every guitar featured in this article. These Taylor acoustic guitars are here based on extensive research and decades of combined guitar experience of Darren and Teemu.


Best Overall – Taylor 814ce

Reviewer: DL Shepherd

Sound
Playability
Overall Quality
Hardware
Value For Money

Summary

This guitar checked off all of the boxes on my list of things that make up my idea of the perfect Taylor.

The Indian rosewood sings in harmony with the Sitka spruce top and provides an incredible mid-range tone with plenty of presence and warmth.

The playability is second to none. A smooth-playing action allows you to venture up into the higher frets courtesy of the cutaway. 

Pros:
-Amazing looks add major stage appeal
-High-quality tonewoods produce sweet, singing tones
-Very comfortable and extremely easy to play
-Versatile and great for every experience level
-True Taylor sound

Cons:
-This guitar deserves a real bone nut and saddle! I’m just not a fan of Micarta or Tusq for these very important parts. 

This guitar is an investment that players from any level can appreciate. Play one and you’ll be hooked.

4.9

How Taylor 814ce sounds:

Is this really the best Taylor, what do you think?
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The Next Best:

Best Live Performer – Taylor 324ce Builder’s Edition

image displays Taylor 324ce Builder’s Edition

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Incredible volume for a Grand Auditorium body
  • Beautiful finish with plenty of stage presence
  • Rich, balanced mid-range tone for excellent articulation on stage
  • Extremely comfortable to play

Cons:

  • Real bone nut and saddle would add more volume and clarity
  • Lack of an onboard tuner is a bit of a bummer for a guitar of this caliber

You need this on stage. Trust me when I say that not all sound guys are created equal. 

Best Dreadnought – Taylor American Dream AD17

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Well-balanced tone with tons of clarity for versatile playing situations
  • Extremely solid construction makes it road-worthy
  • Comfortable to play for guitarist of all skill levels

Cons:

  • This guitar really needs a real bone nut and saddle to maximize tonal potential
  • I would have personally preferred a gloss finish over the matte finish for better visual appeal

Those who are looking for a high-quality dreadnought with exceptional tone and playability should look no further than the Taylor American Dream AD17.

Best Budget Taylor – Taylor Academy 10e

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Quality tonewoods provide a full, rich tone
  • Dreadnought size provides impressive volume without playing hard
  • Shortened scale length is great for smaller hands
  • Onboard electronics make it an incredibly versatile full-bodied acoustic

Cons:

  • Some more experienced players may not like the shorter scale length
  • A real bone nut and saddle would add a bit more tonal balance
  • Taylor needs to add an onboard tuner to the ES2 system

If you aren’t quite ready to fork out big bucks on a higher-end Taylor, I enthusiastically recommend that you give the Taylor Academy 10e your consideration. 

Best Travel – Taylor BT2 Baby Taylor

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Our Overall Rating

Summary

Pros:

  • Choice woods produce impressive volume and tone
  • Small size is great for travel or smaller players
  • Comes with a travel case! 

Cons:

  • A simple onboard electronics system would improve versatility
  • Players with larger hands may find the ¾ scale a bit too small for them

It has plenty of usable volume, and they are right at home in the studio. I would venture to say that many players would appreciate what this little guitar has to offer when it comes to sound and playability.

Compare Key Specs:

graphic compares 5 Best Taylor Guitars

Compare The Tonewoods:

Graphic compares acoustic guitar tonewoods

Top: Solid Sitka Spruce

Back & Sides: Solid Indian Rosewood

Neck: Tropical Mahogany

Fretboard: West African Ebony

The fretboard and neck don’t affect the tone much.

Top: Solid Mahogany

Back & Sides: Solid Urban Ash

Neck: Tropical Mahogany

Fretboard: Ebony

Top: Solid Spruce

Back & Sides: Solid Ovangkol

Neck: Mahogany

Fretboard: Eucalyptus

Top: Solid Sitka Spruce

Back & Sides: Layered Sapele

Neck: Hard Rock Maple

Fretboard: Ebony

Top: Solid Tropical American Mahogany

Back & Sides: Layered Sapele

Neck: Maple

Fretboard: West African Crelicam Ebony

We got the specs from Taylor’s site.

For more cool info about tonewoods, check this acoustic guitar tonewoods article.


I have painstakingly managed to narrow down a list of the 5 Best Taylor Acoustic Guitars. I will emphasize the word “painstakingly” because it was not an easy task. However, I based the criteria on guitars that I have actually played

Here at guitaristnextdoor.com, we don’t cut corners: we actually work to provide you with the best information possible so that you can make an informed decision. 

So, after several days of contemplation and heavy consideration, here are GNDs Taylor reviews!

If you are not sure if Taylors are the right choice for you, check this article: “Are Taylor Acoustic Guitars Any Good?


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Top 5 Taylors

Best Overall Taylor – Taylor 814ce

Specs

Body StyleGrand Auditorium with Cutaway
TopSolid Sitka Spruce
Back & SidesSolid Indian Rosewood
NeckTropical Mahogany
Fretboard20 frets, West African Ebony
Nut MaterialBlack Graphite
Nut Width1.75″
ElectronicsTaylor Expression System 2
SaddleMicarta
Scale-Length25.5″

We wrote a full acoustic guitar pickup guide, check it out too!

Here it is, folks! The greatest Taylor guitar out there. I’ve played more expensive models and I have played less expensive models. However, this guitar checked off all of the boxes on my list of things that make up my idea of the perfect Taylor.

Here’s why…

Construction/Appearance

displays Taylor 814ce acoustic guitar
Stunning Taylor 814ce acoustic guitar.

I love a good Indian Rosewood guitar. They just sound like a guitar is supposed to sound in my head. The Taylor 814ce has an Indian Rosewood back and sides, solid Sitka spruce top, mahogany neck, and an ebony fingerboard

Taylor’s impeccable attention to detail really shines through with the 814ce. By that I mean I really wanted to see if they would take my Jeep in on trade for this guitar. I’d rather be seen walking up the street with this guitar than driving my Jeep. It’s that impressive.

It has more visual appointments than other Taylor. The Grand Auditorium body sports a rock maple binding and has a single-ring abalone rosette. I’m a sucker for abalone.

A rosewood pickguard, ebony peghead overlay, and “Element” fingerboard inlays all provide an impressive, professional look. 

It was truly love at first sight for me. 

Playability/Sound

Coincidentally, it was also love at first strum for me as well. If you want a clear acoustic tone, this is your guitar. 

The Indian rosewood sings in harmony with the Sitka spruce top and provides an incredible mid-range tone with plenty of presence and warmth. The 814ce is a single-cutaway acoustic, but you would never be able to tell it. It is powerful, projecting, and extremely well-balanced. It’s got the true Taylor sound.

Hear how this guitar sounds plugged in:

It sports a gloss finish over the entire body, making the beautiful grain of the tonewoods jump out at you. 

I may sound like a broken record, but the playability is second to none. A smooth-playing action allows you to venture up into the higher frets courtesy of the cutaway. 

I’m a fan of the smaller Grand Auditorium body style, and I could not stop playing fingerstyle blues licks on this thing. I could see the sales associate’s face as I played it. He figured I would take it to the counter. 

I almost did…and I will one day. 

The ES2 system is present on this guitar, allowing for increased versatility whether in the studio or on stage. Additionally, the armrest adds so much comfort that you may catch yourself calling into work just so you can sit around and play it all day. 

I would, but then again, Teemu doesn’t give me sick days. 

This guitar is an investment that players from any level can appreciate. Play one and you’ll be hooked. 

Yeah, it’s that awesome.

Pros:

  • Amazing looks add major stage appeal
  • High-quality tonewoods produce sweet, singing tones
  • Very comfortable and extremely easy to play
  • Versatile and great for every experience level
  • True Taylor sound

Cons:

  • This guitar deserves a real bone nut and saddle! I’m just not a fan of Micarta or Tusq for these very important parts. 
What others are saying:

I wanted an acoustic to last a lifetime, with ease of play (ailing hands) and beautiful sound as key criteria. My 814ce arrived in a beautiful case within a box within a box in perfect condition. I let it acclimate to the house for a couple hours and took it out, all ready to tune… but its tuning was perfect even after shipping! The rounded body edge is very comfortable for my strumming arm, and the neck / fretting is exactly as hoped – easy to fret; zero buzzing; crystal clear with every strum / pick. And it looks absolutely gorgeous too. – Ed from VA


Best Live Performer – Taylor 324ce Builder’s Edition

image displays Taylor 324ce Builder’s Edition

Specs

Body StyleGrand Auditorium with Cutaway
TopSolid Mahogany
Back & SidesSolid Urban Ash
NeckTropical Mahogany
Fretboard20 frets, Ebony
NutTusq
Nut Width1.75″
ElectronicsExpression System 2
SaddleMicarta
Scale-Length25.5″

All Taylors are stage-ready. It doesn’t matter what model you choose. 

However, the Taylor 324ce Builder’s Edition stands out among Taylors extensive lineup when it comes to live performances. Let’s see why…

Construction/Appearance

The Taylor 324ce is constructed from a tonewood that defies industry “standards”: Urban Ash. This wood is sourced from Ash trees that are removed from urban areas due to factors such as disease, risk of infrastructure or property damage, or simply because they have reached the end of their life cycle. 

That’s a pretty smart move on behalf of Taylor. I mean, they are literally repurposing what most would consider useless debris and turning it into stunning works of art. Major kudos. 

The top and neck are made from tropical mahogany, and the bracing system is what is known as V-bracing. This gives extra support for the top while allowing it to resonate freely for a completely unrestricted response.

When you pick this guitar up, you know right away that you have a solid, well-built performer. 

The truss rod cover, headstock overlay, fingerboard, and bridge pins are all made from West African Crelicam Ebony which adds a substantial contrast to the gorgeous Tobacco Kona Burst finish.

Throw in the included Elixer strings, a satin finish, a beveled armrest, and Expression System 2 electronics, and you have a guitar that absolutely shines on stage. 

Playability/Sound

Hear how this sounds:

I do not have to go into a lot of detail here, because there aren’t enough words in any language to describe how incredibly smooth the Taylor 324ce plays. 

The body is a Grand Auditorium style, so it sits easily in the lap and feels well-balanced when strapped on. This makes it great for players who want to get away from the typical, often bulky dreadnought style.

The satin finish allows for a buttery smooth feel when traveling up and down the neck, and the action is among the most comfortable that I have ever felt. This makes it a great transitional guitar for electric players who are looking for a higher-end acoustic to add to their guitar locker. 

The armrest adds even more comfort and a bit of visual flair. It makes the guitar exceptionally comfortable on the strumming arm and reduces fatigue due primarily to the slight angle it provides. 

Little things make a huge difference. 

As far as the sound and tone are concerned, players can expect the guitar to have a very rich, powerful tone.

Low notes flow well within the low-middle spectrum, and the highs are much warmer. This is due to the combination of tonewoods, and it really reminds you of an all-mahogany guitar.

It is not dark at all though and has an impressive amount of mid-range punch for a Grand Auditorium. Whether you are using the onboard electronics, a microphone, or simply playing without amplification, the Taylor 324ce gives an exceptional, well-balanced tone across the spectrum. 

You need this on stage. Trust me when I say that not all sound guys are created equal. 

Pros:

  • Incredible volume for a Grand Auditorium body
  • Beautiful finish with plenty of stage presence
  • Rich, balanced mid-range tone for excellent articulation on stage
  • Extremely comfortable to play

Cons:

  • Real bone nut and saddle would add more volume and clarity
  • Lack of an onboard tuner is a bit of a bummer for a guitar of this caliber
What others are saying:

Really nice guitar. The guitar has a wonderful tone. I find it visually pleasing. Maybe best of all, I discovered all the talk about the builder’s edition features isn’t just sales hype.. It is extremely comfortable to hold and play. I don’t want to put it down. It is not a particularly loud guitar when played acoustically but with a mahogany top I wasn’t expecting it to be. I have absolutely no regrets about buying this guitar. – Michael from VA


Best Dreadnought – Taylor American Dream AD17

Specs

Body StyleRound Shoulder Dreadnought
TopSolid Spruce
Back & SidesSolid Ovangkol
NeckMahogany
Fretboard20 frets, Eucalyptus
NutBlack Tusq
Nut Width1.75″
ElectronicsNo
SaddleMicarta
Scale-Length25.5″

Regardless of whether you appreciate Paul McCartney or not, he was definitely onto something when he opted for an Epiphone Texan. It really is a “Masterbilt” instrument in every way.

For those looking for a straightforward acoustic with a more familiar dreadnought body style, the Taylor American Dream AD17 is a perfect choice.

It sports a lot of features found on Taylor’s higher-end guitars and is especially appealing to those who want a guitar without electronics. 

This guitar nails the K.I.S.S. principle perfectly (Keep It Simple Stupid). 

Construction/Appearance

Taylor refers to the AD17’s body style as “Grand Pacific”. Basically, this is just a round-shouldered dreadnought (as opposed to the typical square-shoulder design). 

It is constructed with high-quality tonewoods: an ovangkol back and sides, solid Sitka spruce top, tropical mahogany neck, and a eucalyptus fingerboard. It’s the first guitar that I have ever played with a fingerboard made from eucalyptus. Visually speaking, it works very well by providing a nice, dark red/brown contrast to the Sitka top. 

The innovative V-bracing keeps the top ringing loud and true and provides excellent structural integrity. 

It is indeed a workhorse guitar in every sense. 

Taylor’s signature minimalistic visual appointments include Italian acrylic dot inlays and a very attractive rosette made of Hawaiian Koa. A tortoise-style pickguard adds a vintage look along with the matte finish. 

Once again, you know you have a solidly built tone machine as soon as you pick it up. 

Playability/Sound

Hear how this Taylor sounds:

The Taylor AD17 plays very much like its more expensive brethren. The action is similar and the neck radius seems to be the same as the Taylor 324ce. 

It lacks a lower cutaway so the higher frets are not as accessible, but the neck joint still allows for some picking past the 14th fret.

The plus side to this is that the dreadnought body style remains true by providing copious amounts of volume and a much fuller tone than cutaway models. 

Check our picks for the best acoustic guitar brands here.

The Taylor AD17 provides players with plenty of sparkly acoustic tone that is incredibly defined.

The combination of tonewoods allows the warmth of the ovangkol to balance perfectly with the Sitka spruce top to produce a well-rounded tone that is almost dead in the middle of the tonal spectrum.

That’s the sweet spot.

 As previously mentioned, there is more than enough volume available with this finely crafted instrument. When single notes are picked with some force, you get clear, cutting articulation that breaks through a mix of other acoustic instruments. It’s rich, bold, and well-rounded – just like a good woman. 

Those who are looking for a high-quality dreadnought with exceptional tone and playability should look no further than the Taylor American Dream AD17.

Pros:

  • Well-balanced tone with tons of clarity for versatile playing situations
  • Extremely solid construction makes it road-worthy
  • Comfortable to play for guitarist of all skill levels

Cons:

  • This guitar really needs a real bone nut and saddle to maximize tonal potential
  • I would have personally preferred a gloss finish over the matte finish for better visual appeal
What others are saying:

I normally avoid full sized guitars, because my stubby arms and overgrown belly make it difficult for me to hold and play them. But when I saw this guitar, I couldn’t resist. I’m so happy I made that choice! This guitar fits like a glove. It’s light, comfortable, and both easy and fun to play. The tone is really amazing, and I just can’t put it down. An American made guitar of this quality should cost an awful lot more, so thank you Taylor, I’m now a customer for life! – Steve from VA


Best Budget Taylor – Taylor Academy 10e

Specs

Body StyleAcademy
TopSolid Spruce
Back & SidesLayered Sapele
NeckHard Rock Maple
Neck ShapeSlim
Fretboard20 frets, Ebony
NutNuBone
Nut Width1.6875″
ElectronicsES-B
SaddleMicarta
Scale-Length24.8″

From my personal perspective, the Taylor Academy 10e is easily in my “personal top 5 favorites of all time” list. I can’t say enough good things about this acoustic-electric guitar.

Well, actually, I can say a ton of good things about this guitar. For the sake of saving you time, I’ll just hit the high points.

Construction/Appearance

When you have a well-built acoustic in your hands, you know it. Taylor’s solid construction quality shines through on the Academy 10e from top to bottom. 

The dreadnought body is constructed of a solid Sitka spruce top and layered Sapele back and sides. It’s a perfect recipe for durability and peace of mind when traveling. A maple neck and ebony fretboard add to the already solid build.

One of the great things about this guitar is its lack of visual appointment. The tonewoods really pop out and create a guitar that needs no fancy inlays or intricate decorative rosettes.

This also means that you save money by paying for what matters: a solid, well-built acoustic that sounds and plays fantastic. 

One feature that is present on the Academy 10e that is typically found only on Taylor’s higher-end guitars is the armrest. This adds a custom-built appearance as well as provides extraordinary playing comfort. 

Playability/Sound

As far as playability is concerned, I can’t think of anything that could make it better. It has the action and overall feel of more expensive Taylor models without the big price tag. 

The scale length is shortened a bit to 24-⅞ inches. At first, I was intimidated by this because I’m not a fan of change when it comes to classic designs. If it’s not broken, why fix it?

However, the shorter scale length does improve the ability to bend notes and switch barre chords more quickly without feeling cramped. I know from years of teaching guitar lessons that barre chords can be challenging for many players. 

I strongly believe that the Taylor Academy 10e would make it much easier for beginning/intermediate players to master many of the various chord structures even if they have smaller hands. Find more solid acoustic guitars for intermediate players here.

Now for the sound…

In my best attempt to describe the sound: it is how I imagine the voices of angels. 

For real, it sounds that good. It’s one of the most openly resonate guitars that I have had the pleasure of playing.

The tone is rich and full just like a dreadnought should be. The lows flow smoothly with great articulation while balanced highs ring out with warmth and clarity. 

You don’t have to coax volume from this guitar by playing it hard. It is just naturally loud and vibrant. When it comes to cutting through a mix, you will take center stage. If you need to go electric, the Taylor Academy 10e has the ES2 system for a balanced, true acoustic tone that does not sound artificial in the slightest.

If you aren’t quite ready to fork out big bucks on a higher-end Taylor, I enthusiastically recommend that you give the Taylor Academy 10e your consideration. It’s overall one of the best budget acoustic guitars.

Pros:

  • Quality tonewoods provide a full, rich tone
  • Dreadnought size provides impressive volume without playing hard
  • Shortened scale length is great for smaller hands
  • Onboard electronics make it an incredibly versatile full-bodied acoustic

Cons:

  • Some more experienced players may not like the shorter scale length
  • A real bone nut and saddle would add a bit more tonal balance
  • Taylor needs to add an onboard tuner to the ES2 system
What others are saying:

After so many years of playing and owning electric guitars from Les Pauls to Strats I decided I wanted an acoustic guitar. I didn’t want to drop a ton of money so I started shopping and I found this Taylor Academy 10e! It was love at first strum. It chords fantastic at any position on the neck. Beautiful to hear, and awesome to play. – Ken from AZ


Best Travel – Taylor BT2 Baby Taylor

Specs

Body Style3/4 Dreadnought
TopSolid Tropical Mahogany
Back & SidesLayered Sapele
NeckMaple
Fretboard19 frets, West African Crelicam Ebony
NutTusq Nut
Nut Width1.6875″
ElectronicsNo
SaddleMicarta
Scale-Length22.75″

When I first played a Baby Taylor, I couldn’t help but say, “Sweet Baby James!” 

Bonus points for those who just got my lame joke containing a James Taylor reference.

Even more bonus points for those who recognized the irony (James Taylor…get it?).

These little ¾ scale guitars are not a toy! They’re a 100% real instrument for players of all skill levels. The fact that they are small is a bonus for younger players or for players who want a good travel companion that doesn’t require much room. 

Construction/Appearance

We got the specs from Taylor’s site.

Obviously, it’s small. I won’t say that again. However, the construction is more than adequate. The woods include a solid tropical mahogany top, layered Sapele back and sides, a maple neck, and an ebony fingerboard.

It is finished off with varnish, allowing the wood grain and laminate to pop out. Depending on the type of varnished used, it may also patina over time for a real old-school look. 

It feels extremely solid for a small guitar, and I would not hesitate to take it on a camping trip or a bonfire jam session. Taylor build the BT2 with the same commitment to quality as they do their higher-end, full-size models. 

It has a minimalistic look with a single-ring rosette and typical white dot fingerboard inlays. However, the appealing part to me is the vintage vibe that it puts off. It reminds me of the old parlor guitars from the ’20s and ’30s. 

Playability/Sound

Taylor originally designed these guitars with smaller, younger players in mind. The Baby Taylors started popping up on stages in the hands of professional musicians like Bono and Taylor Swift, therefore allowing more guitarists to take it more seriously. 

With that being said, the BT2 is a great guitar for a beginner. It has that smooth action and playability that Taylors is known for, and the scale length is perfect when you just want to “pick up and play”. 

Hear how this Baby sounds:

The sound of the BT2 differs from its brother, the BT1, because of the wood choices. The Sapele laminate and mahogany combination gives a smooth, rich, dark tone with a little more dryness overall. The highs stay warm, which is a huge deal for a guitar with reduced body size. 

Read our laminate vs solid wood acoustic guide here.

It has plenty of usable volume, and they are right at home in the studio. I would venture to say that many players would appreciate what this little guitar has to offer when it comes to sound and playability.

Pros:

  • Choice woods produce impressive volume and tone
  • Small size is great for travel or smaller players
  • Comes with a travel case! 

Cons:

  • A simple onboard electronics system would improve versatility
  • Players with larger hands may find the ¾ scale a bit too small for them
What others are saying:

I got this guitar because I was getting into writing/learning more classical style music. For such a small body I would say it sounds better than some lower cost full sized guitars. The neck is perfectly sized and the smaller scale makes it alot easier to go up and down the neck. The included gig bag is also high quality and looks pretty sweet. I would definitely recommend this little guy for how high quality it is for the price compared to other acoustics I’ve played. Overall I’d say this is a great guitar to have especially if you want Taylor quality without the high price tag of their other models. – Matthew from MI


How We Chose These Taylor Acoustic Guitars

  1. We decided which Taylors to recommend by using our own experience, doing extensive research, visiting music stores, and asking help from our musician friends
  2. After we had chosen the best guitars to recommend we looked for a good way to test the gear. This means either renting it, buying it, testing it in a music store, or visiting a friend who owns it. This time, our main testing method was playing these acoustic guitars in music stores.
  3. Even after this, we’ll still do another round of extensive research to make sure that this specific product is in fact, a real cream-of-the-crop candidate.
  4. Then we wrote this in-depth but easily digestible review about these acoustic guitars. We kept in mind who will be playing them (most likely) such as bluegrass players, blues players, players who want to plug in, beginners, advanced players, etc. 

Most acoustic guitars we recommend are run through tests like these:

  • We go carefully through the finish and build quality of the guitar.
  • We inspect the fretwork and edges of the fretboard to make sure there are no sharp edges.
  • We play the acoustic guitar unplugged and plugged in.
  • We use different playing techniques, such as fingerpicking, flatpicking, strumming, tapping, and even percussive playing.
  • We measure and weight the guitar.
  • We try licks and riffs from different genres.

Learn more about GND’s testing and reviewing processes here.

DL Shepherd

Darren has been playing guitar for over 25 years and teaching guitar since High-School. He fronted the metal band Suddenly Silence in the early 2000’s, and also achieved recognition as an award-winning bluegrass guitarist. A native of southwestern Virginia, and has shared the stage with many big-name acts from various genres. When he is not playing one of his many guitars, he can be found riding his Harley through the mountains of Virginia. Expertise: teaching guitars, electric guitars, acoustic guitars, guitar amplifiers, guide pedals, flatpicking, bluegrass, metal, rock, and blues.
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kyle

Man… I love Taylors too. I think I’ll settle for the Academy 10. 814ce is just too expensive. Thanks for the article!

Teemu Suomala

Hi Kyle and thanks for commenting! I think that Academy 10 is a rock-solid choice. I hope you will love it!

John

I would never buy a mass produced guitar from sny guitar manufacturer. There are many other small builders whi build close to boutique quality guitars for a much better value for the price. Taylor makes about 700 guitars a day. Mass produced with little attention to the soundboard and its sonic properties. In the beginning Taylor was a quality guitar. But demand made production so high it’s hit or miss with the guitars.

Teemu Suomala

Hi John! I agree that mass-production has some problems. But I think it can be done right. By this, I mean great quality control and staff who really want to build amazing guitars and take pride in what they do. Take care, my friend!

Teemu Suomala

Played the Taylor Taylor 814ce a couple of weeks ago in a music store nearby…amazing. Hard to beat that one, especially in terms of playability. It was a bit quieter than I expected, but otherwise, just amazing. Darren got things right here!
 
But curious, how a bit cheaper models like 424ce, 512ce, 612ce compare to the 814ce in terms of playability? Has any of you guys played these?

Prison-Mike

Played 612ce and 814ce head to head…612ce has a tad shorter scale. bit softer feel on strings because of that, but not necessarily “better”. Difference was not huge. but I prefer Indian rosewood & sitka spruce tonewood combo of 814ce over maple & sitka spruce of 612ce.

Corey

The price of 814CE is just sooo freaking steep…. Have to go with a model that doesn’t require a mortgage, haha

Dave

I own a Taylor 814 CE Woodsongs, Ser # 1. Bought it ten years ago. Last week I bought a Taylor GS Mini Plus KOA on impulse. Guess which one I pickup to noodle around with and have fun at home! Just saying!

Teemu Suomala

Hi Dave! 814ce is THE #1 Acoustic for me. Don’t own one, but have played it. It’s great. But I personally might pick the cheaper GS Mini (that’s still great acoustic) for noodling purposes more often and save 814ce for serious situations, haha.

Tyler Connaghan

Met Taylor’s Andy Powers (the company’s master guitar designer) a few years back. We talked a bit about Taylor’s sustainable Urban Wood project, which made me fall in love with the brand even more. I urge you all to check it out!