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Last Updated on March 13, 2024 by Teemu Suomala

You know what? Jazzmasters dimensions are both a blessing and a curse. If you’ve ever held one, you’ll know Jazzmaster size isn’t what you would call small or traditional, especially when it came out in 1958. On the contrary, it’s one of the biggest, boldest shapes of that era…and still is.

Author: Santiago Motto

Aka. Sandel. Telecasters and all-mahogany Martins lover.

Besides that, Sandel is a professional writer, guitar player, confessed guitar nerd, and all-things-guitar consumer. He has been playing for 25 years which makes him a nineties kid with serious low-tuning youngster years, and a pop palate for melodies, ballads, and world music.

Whenever Santiago is not pouring all that experience and love for the instrument into articles, you can find him playing live shows supporting his music and poetry books as “Sandel”. If he’s not doing either of those, you can also find him gigging with his band, “San Juan”, writing, reading, or enjoying the Sun.

displays Edward Bond and Gibson Guitar

Editor: Edward Bond

Edward has been playing the guitar since 2002. So Edward has over 20 years of experience as a guitarist, has authored 15 guitar books, has written for renowned music blogs, and spent a decade teaching music. He began merging his passion for writing and music in 2020 and has written for big guitar websites such as Guitar Head Publishing and KillerGuitarRigs.com.

Originally from Seattle, Edward moved to Norway in 2021 for a master’s in music. He’s studied at the Jazz Institute Berlin and Conservatorium van Amsterdam, and currently resides in Trondheim. His education includes a European Jazz Master’s, a diploma in Film and Game Scoring from Sofia, and a Bachelor’s in Jazz from University of Oregon.

Edward has played in numerous bands and currently, Edward works on his own project Starship Infinity


But why are Jazzmaster dimensions important? This guitar is a surf icon, an indie statement, but mostly a punk, grunge, and alternative rock powerhouse. We all know those musical styles often involve bombastic stage performances.

Well, in my last two decades, I’ve done the whole rock show thing with Jazzmasters, and I can tell you exactly how each dimension of it affects playing comfort, sound, and reliability.

What you’re about to read is not just a collection of numbers but what those numbers mean for players like you and me.

Are you ready to surf the big wave? Strap on to that board because here we go!


Fender Jazzmaster Dimensions

Jazzmaster Body Dimensions

image shows Fender Custom Shop '59 250K Jazzmaster Journeyman Relic Electric Guitar finished in Chocolate 3-color Sunburst
Fender Custom Shop ’59 250K Jazzmaster Journeyman Relic Electric Guitar – Chocolate 3-color Sunburst

*Consider all links in this post to be affiliate links. If you purchase, at no additional cost to you, we may earn a small commission. It helps us to keep the lights on, thanks! 🙂

To begin talking about the Jazzmaster’s body dimensions, we have to talk about the Jazzmaster’s body shape. The Jazzmaster is an offset guitar. Yes, the lower bout and upper horn give it a particular form that departs from the traditional Stratocaster or Telecaster shape.

This means that the guitar feels different when you strap it on. Although the Jazzmaster body thickness is relatively small, because of its comfortable contours, Jazzmaster’s length and Jazzmaster’s width make it a big instrument.

That said, the offset body balances perfectly with the upper horn and the lower bout. Therefore, although it might look intimidating initially, Jazzmasters are balanced, easy-to-play instruments.

Overall Length40.62”103.2 cm
Body Length19.18”48.73 cm
Body Width (at Widest Point/Lower Bout)14”35.6 cm
Body Depth/Thickness1.69” 4.3 cm
Scale Length25 ½”64.8 cm
Weight8.5 lbs.3.9 kg

Jazzmaster Neck Dimensions

image shows neck of Fender Custom Shop '59 250K Jazzmaster Journeyman Relic Electric Guitar - Chocolate 3-color Sunburst
Fender Custom Shop ’59 250K Jazzmaster Journeyman Relic Electric Guitar – Chocolate 3-color Sunburst

We know as players that the neck is a deal-maker or breaker when choosing a guitar. Well, this part of the Jazzmaster anatomy feels exactly like home.

If you’re a Fender player used to Telecaster or Stratocaster dimensions, the Jazzmaster scale length will feel natural. Moreover, Jazzmaster neck dimensions are the same as those on most Fender guitars with modern C and D shapes.

Furthermore, you’ll find bound necks, unbound necks, pearloid, clay, or even block inlays. Finally, even headstock size changed with time. But it all feels very familiar for Fender players.

Neck ProfileAvailable in C-Shape and D-Shape
Neck Width1.650″ or 4.2 cm at the nut2.187″ or 5.6 cm at the neck joint
Neck thickness1st Fret: 0.820″ or 2.08 cm12th Fret: 0.900″ or 2.08 cm
Headstock length7.7” or 19.55 cm

Jazzmaster Fretboard Dimensions

Beyond Jazzmaster’s neck shape, we need to talk about the fretboard radius and fret sizes. These make the feel of the guitar. In terms of bending, chording, and riffing, these guitars have the ’60s feel of the best Fenders.

Nevertheless, if you’re a shredder or a metal head (hey there, Jim Root!), you can get a Jazzmaster with a modern 9.5” radius or even a compound radius that can go to 16”.

There’s virtually nothing you can’t play on a Jazzmaster because of a fretboard restriction.

Fretboard radius7.25″ or 18.4 cm9.5″ or 24.1 cm10” – 14″ or 25.4 cm – 35.5 cm compound radius 12″ – 16″ or 30.4 cm – 40.6 cm compound radius 
Nut Width1.650″ or 4.2 cm
Number of FretsAvailable with 21 and 22 frets
Fret sizeNarrow Tall, Vintage Tall, Vintage, Jumbo, and Medium Jumbo

Neck and Bridge Pickup Dimensions

Besides pickup dimensions and the strange pickguard dimensions, Jazzmasters offer a unique playing experience that has a lot to do with the pickups and the bridge (more on that later).

Although some people might think these are P-90s, they’re not. Believe me, they don’t have P-90’s aggressive bite, but they do sound a little “bigger” than Strat or Tele single coils. In summary, they sound like nothing else, which is part of the Jazzmaster’s magic.

Neck Pickup Length3.62” or 9.2 cm
Neck Pickup Height0.567” or 1.44 cm
Neck Pickup Width1.6” or 4 cm
Bridge Pickup Length3.62” or 9.2 cm
Bridge Pickup Height0.567” or 1.44 cm
Bridge Pickup Width1.6” or 4 cm
Tremolo Cavity1.37″ or 3.49 cm
Rhythm Circuit Cavity1″ or 2.54 cm
Lead Circuit Cavity1.37″ or 3.49 cm
Pickup Cavities0.562” or 1.42 cm

Mini Jazzmaster Dimensions

Jazzmasters have a full-scale version but also a miniature one. Well, it’s not entirely a miniature, but it’s a 3/4-sized version that the company called Mini Jazzmasters.

Fancy trying one out? Well, here are the dimensions.

Overall Length30.47” or 77.4 cm
Body Length14.38” or 36.54 cm
Body Width10.5” or 26.7 cm
Body Depth1.69” or 4.3 cm
Neck ProfileC-Shaped
Scale Length22.75” or 57.8 cm
Nut Width1.598″ or 4 cm
Neck Width1.60” or 4.06 cm
Fretboard Radius9.5” or 24.1 cm
Number of Frets20 frets
Weight5 lbs. or 2.26 kg
Fret SizeNarrow Tall

*All measurements belong to the Squier Mini Jazzmaster HH.

image show Squier Mini Jazzmaster HH Electric Guitar finished in Daphne Blue with Maple Fingerboard
Squier Mini Jazzmaster HH Electric Guitar – Daphne Blue with Maple Fingerboard

Key Features of Jazzmasters

  • Pickups – As said above, Jazzmaster pickups sound like nothing else. They enhance the big-body sound but keep that razor-like edge of single-coil pickups. In a nutshell, if you want your guitar to sound menacing and mean but still clear and defined, you need to try a Jazzmaster today.

  • Tremolo System – There’s absolutely nothing out there like the Jazzmaster (or Jaguar) tremolo system. When perfectly set up, you get this fantastic feeling close to surfing a wave with your board. Yes, it’s subtle, organic, and with a tremolo arm so long you can play anything with it (right, Kevin Shields?)

BTW. Check the ultimate showdown here: Fender Jaguar vs Jazzmaster.

  • Strings Behind the Bridge – The strings on the Jazzmaster don’t go through the body; on the contrary, they continue after the bridge and give you an extra spot to strum them. With the right effects and amp, you get a different set of usable tones and resources.

3 Best Jazzmasters – Our Favorites

Best Budget – Squier Classic Vibe ‘60s Jazzmaster

image shows Squier Classic Vibe '60s Jazzmaster finished in Sonic Blue
Squier Classic Vibe ’60s Jazzmaster – Sonic Blue

This Squier version of the ’60s Jazzmaster is the closest you can get in a budget to the real deal. Let me tell you that right out of the box, you can walk with it on stage. But if you do a small overhaul (pickups, tuners, and bridge), you can walk on any stage with it.

If you’re looking for a great backup or a good-sounding Jazzmaster on a budget, you must try this one.

Best Overall – Fender American Ultra Jazzmaster

image shows Fender American Ultra Jazzmaster finished in Mocha Burst with Rosewood Fingerboard
Fender American Ultra Jazzmaster – Mocha Burst with Rosewood Fingerboard

From the modern D-shaped neck with a compound 10 to 14” radius tapered neck to the easy-access cutaway, this guitar is a joy to play. Adding to that combo the locking tuners, ultra-silent noiseless pickups, advanced electronics (modern switching), and enhanced body contours, this guitar plays and sounds as great as it looks.

In my opinion, this is the best Jazzmaster Fender has done to this date.

Best Premium – Fender American Vintage II 1966 Jazzmaster

image shows Fender American Vintage II 1966 Jazzmaster Electric Guitar finished in Dakota Red
Fender American Vintage II 1966 Jazzmaster Electric Guitar – Dakota Red

Just opening this case is a treat. The dazzling Dakota Red (which can also be Sunburst or Lake Placid Blue) with matching headstock is something you would expect from a Custom Shop instrument. The bound neck with block pearloid inlays, specially designed pickups, and all the reliability of a new guitar make this instrument a joy to play and watch.

In my opinion, this is the perfect vintage-style Jazzmaster to play every night on the stage and in the studio.


Conclusion: Fender Jazzmaster Dimensions

Fender Jazzmaster dimensions might be a little intimidating for Stratocaster players. Yes, body measurements especially feel mammoth big and, hence, uncomfortable. Let me tell you all of that is just prejudice because this guitar feels comfortable, isn’t so heavy, and is perfectly balanced.

The real question is: do you dare to be unique? Because Jazzmasters have a sound of their own.

Do you own one already? Do you agree on the comfort and the sound? What feature do you like the best? 

Please leave me a message in the comments. I would love to read everything about it!

Happy (offset) playing!


FAQs

What Are the Dimensions of a Fender Jazzmaster?

Overall Length40.62” or 103.2 cm
Body Width (at Widest Point/Lower Bout)14” or 35.6 cm
Body Depth/Thickness1.69” or 4.3 cm

What Is the Scale Length of the Fender Jazzmaster?

The scale length of a Fender Jazzmaster is 25 ½” or about 64.8 cm

Are All Jazzmasters the Same Size?

No, there are two main sizes of Jazzmasters: the full-size Jazzmaster and the Mini-Jazzmaster, which is a ¾ size guitar.

Is the Jazzmaster Good for Small Hands?

Yes, the Jazzmaster can work for small hands. The string spacing on a Jazzmaster is identical to that of a Stratocaster or Telecaster. If you can get around those guitars, you’ll feel at home with a Jazzmaster, too.

Are Jazzmasters Heavy?

At an average weight of 8.5 lbs. or 3.9 kg, they’re not too heavy.

What Genres Is a Jazzmaster Good For?

Depending on string height, Jazzmasters can do great in these styles:

  • Surf.
  • Indie rock.
  • Alternative music.
  • Grunge.
  • Garage.
  • Shoegaze.
  • Ambient music.

Do Jazzmasters Fit in Strat Cases?

No, a Jazzmaster will not fit in a standard Strat case. The body dimensions are quite different. 

What Famous Guitarists Play a Jazzmaster?

  • Surf.
  • Indie rock.
  • Alternative music.
  • Grunge.
  • Garage.
  • Shoegaze.
  • Ambient music.

Santiago Motto

Aka. Sandel. Pure Telecasters and all-mahogany Martins lover. Besides that, Sandel is a professional writer, guitar player, confessed guitar nerd, and all-things-guitar consumer. He has been playing for 25 years which makes him a nineties kid with serious low-tuning youngster years, and a pop palate for melodies, ballads, and world music. You can connect with Santiago on LinkedIn or just email him.
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