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Last Updated on March 4, 2024 by Teemu Suomala

Displays Tyler Connaghan - guitar player and writer

Author: Tyler Connaghan

Tyler Connaghan is a guitarist, singer, producer, composer & engineer based in Los Angeles, California. Tyler has been playing the guitar since 2007. In between writing for guitar publications, he produces music for film and television. His favorite axe is his custom Pelham Blue Fender Stratocaster.

Expertise: music industry, producing, acoustic & electric guitars, songwriting

Bachelor of Science in Music Industry Studies, Music Industry

displays Edward Bond and Gibson Guitar

Editor: Edward Bond

Edward has been playing the guitar since 2002. So Edward has over 20 years of experience as a guitarist, has authored 15 guitar books, has written for renowned music blogs, and spent a decade teaching music. He began merging his passion for writing and music in 2020 and has written for big guitar websites such as Guitar Head Publishing and KillerGuitarRigs.com.

Originally from Seattle, Edward moved to Norway in 2021 for a master’s in music. He’s studied at the Jazz Institute Berlin and Conservatorium van Amsterdam, and currently resides in Trondheim. His education includes a European Jazz Master’s, a diploma in Film and Game Scoring from Sofia, and a Bachelor’s in Jazz from University of Oregon.

Edward has played in numerous bands and currently, Edward works on his own project Starship Infinity


The Fender Stratocaster might be the most instantly recognizable guitar on Earth. For more than half a century, it has paved its way through the halls of rock n’ roll, funk, blues, pop, and beyond. From Eric Clapton to Jimi Hendrix to Stevie Ray Vaughan, the legendary musicians who have used the Stratocaster to create their unique hits are countless. 

Beyond its status as one of the great guitars, one thing that makes the Strat so unique is its dimensions — the nuanced yet critical specifications that shape every subtlety of its character.

Whether you’re getting ready to build your own Stratocaster or want a deeper insight into the anatomy of this electric guitar, continue reading as we explore the Stratocaster dimensions.


Fender Stratocaster Measurements & Dimensions

The Standard Strat Dimensions

Displays rugged Fender Stratocaster of the author Tyler Connaghan
My Fender American Performer Stratocaster.

For these measurements, I used my American Performer Stratocaster (above). Fender uses the imperial system for manufacturing, so all guitar dimensions are given in inches and pounds.

Overall Length38.9  in.
Body Length18.5 in.
Body Width (at lower bout)12.75 in.
Body Depth1.75 in.
Neck Profile“C” Shape
Scale Length25.5 in.
Nut Width1.60 in.
Neck or Fretboard Length18.5 in.
Neck Width2.2 in
Neck Thickness0.9 in. at 12th fret
Neck Radius9.5 in.
Fretboard Radius9.5 in.
Number of Frets21 frets
Stratocaster Headstock Length7.3 in.
Weight7.5 pounds
Stratocaster Pickguard11.5 x 8.3 in.
Bridge Cavity Width2.2 in.
Bridge Cavity Length3.5 in.
Bridge Cavity Depth0.5 in.
Pickup Length (Single-Coil)2.75 in.
Pickup Width (Single-Coil)0.7 in.
Pickup Depth (Single-Coil)0.75 in.
Fretboard Thickness (at 12th Fret)0.85 in.

Super-strats & Other Modern Strat Designs

Jackson Soloist

Overall Length39 in.
Body Length17.5 in.
Body Width (at lower bout)12.75 in.
Body Depth1.75 in.
Neck ProfileSpeed Neck (rounded D profile neck)
Scale Length25.5 in.
Nut Width1.6875 in.
Neck or Fretboard Length18.5 in.
Neck Width1.6875 in.
Neck Thickness0.85 in. at 12th fret
Neck Radius12 – 16 in.
Fretboard Radius12 – 16 in.
Number of Frets24 frets
Soloist Headstock Length7.5 in.
Weight8.33 pounds
Soloist PickguardN/A
Bridge Cavity Width1.57 in.
Bridge Cavity Length3.14 in.
Bridge Cavity Depth0.75 in.
Pickup Length (Single-Coil)1.4 in.
Pickup Width (Single-Coil)3.06 in.
Pickup Depth (Single-Coil)0.557 in.
Fretboard Thickness (at 12th Fret)0.75 in.

Charvel 5150

Overall Length39 in.
Body Length17.5 in.
Body Width (at lower bout)12.5 in.
Body Depth1.75 in.
Neck ProfileModified “C” profile
Scale Length25.5 in.
Nut Width1.685 in.
Neck or Fretboard Length19.4 in.
Neck Width2.08 in. at 12th fret
Neck Thickness.85 in. at 12th fret
Neck Radius12 – 16 in.
Fretboard Radius12 – 16 in.
Number of Frets24 frets
5150 Headstock Length7.5 in.
Weight7.05 pounds
5150 PickguardN/A
Bridge Cavity Width1.57 in.
Bridge Cavity Length3.14 in.
Bridge Cavity Depth0.75 in.
Pickup Length (Single-Coil)1.4 in.
Pickup Width (Single-Coil)3.06 in.
Pickup Depth (Single-Coil)0.557 in.
Fretboard Thickness (at 12th Fret)0.75 in.

Ibanez Prestige

Overall Length39 in.
Body Length17.5 in.
Body Width (at lower bout)12.1 in.
Body Depth1.49 in.
Neck ProfileWizard neck profile
Scale Length25.5 in.
Nut Width1.6875 in.
Neck or Fretboard Length18.5 in.
Neck Width2.2 in. at 24th fret
Neck Thickness0.74 at 12th fret
Neck Radius12 – 16 in.
Fretboard Radius12 – 16 in.
Number of Frets12 – 16 in.
Prestige Headstock Length7.97 in.
Weight8.2 pounds
Prestige PickguardN/A
Bridge Cavity Width1.57 in.
Bridge Cavity Length3.14 in.
Bridge Cavity Depth0.75 in.
Pickup Length (Single-Coil)1.4 in.
Pickup Width (Single-Coil)3.06 in.
Pickup Depth (Single-Coil)0.557 in.
Fretboard Thickness (at 12th Fret)0.75 in.

Mini Stratocaster Dimensions

For these measurements, I used a standard Squier Mini Stratocaster.

Overall Length33.5 in.
Body Length13 in.
Body Width (at lower bout)10.5 in.
Body Depth1.5 in.
Neck Profile“C” Shape
Scale Length22.75 in.
Nut Width1.6 in.
Neck or Fretboard Length15.75 in.
Neck Width1.6 in.
Neck Thickness0.9 in. at 12th fret
Neck Radius9.5 in.
Fretboard Radius9.5 in.
Number of Frets20 frets
Mini Stratocaster Headstock Length5.75 in.
Weight5.8 pounds
Mini Stratocaster Pickguard8.6 x 6.2 in.
Bridge Cavity Width2.2 in.
Bridge Cavity Length3.5 in.
Bridge Cavity Depth0.5 in.
Pickup Length (Single-Coil)2.75 in.
Pickup Width (Single-Coil)0.7 in.
Pickup Depth (Single-Coil)0.75 in.
Fretboard Thickness (at 12th Fret)0.85 in.

Key Features Of Stratocasters

  • Wood: Most Fender Stratocasters are made with alder, though some Deluxe models use ash.
  • Necks: While most popular Fender Stratocasters use classic “C” necks, depending on the model you get, it could also have a “D”, “V”, or “U” neck profile.
  • Fingerboard: Depending on the model you get, your Strat could come with a rosewood or maple fingerboard.
  • Electronics: Most standard Stratocaster models have three single-coil pickups and a five-way pickup switch.
  • Tremolo: Synchronized tremolo systems can change depending on the model. You can either get a 6-saddle Vintage-Style Synchronized Tremolo or a modern 2-point Pop-In Tremolo

A Timeline History of Fender Strats ’54-Today: What’s The Difference?

Which Stratocaster Design Is Right For Me?

With so many different Stratocaster models out there, there are several things to consider before making the ultimate choice. 

Let’s take a look at a few of the most important considerations. 

  • Your Size: Are you relatively small? How about your hands or arms? If so, consider a smaller Strat, such as the Squier Mini, the smallest Stratocaster.
  • Neck Profile: Though the “C” neck shape is pretty versatile, some people prefer something different, such as a rounded “U” neck for a more substantial feel or a “Slim C” neck for a slightly narrower grip.
  • Scale Length: The biggest influence scale length has is the tension on the strings. While 25.5” is standard for Strats, you might consider shorter Stratocaster neck dimensions for smoother, easier bends with less tension. 
  • Body Size: This is entirely preferential, and you might be best off going to your local guitar shop and sitting down with a bunch of different Strat models to decide which contour fits your body best.
  • Weight: How much a guitar weighs can be a huge consideration if you plan to play out live. The lighter the guitar, the easier it will be to play standing up for hours on end.
  • Tone: Hundreds of small characteristics can impact the overall tone of your guitar, from the type of pickups to the wood on the neck. Again, I recommend checking out your local guitar shop or watching a few video reviews of these guitars to find one that best suits your tonal preferences.

Now that you better understand Strat body dimensions and why they’re so important, you might also consider seeing how they compare to other electric guitar body shapes.


5 Best Stratocasters

*Consider all links in this post to be affiliate links. If you purchase, at no additional cost to you, we may earn a small commission. It helps us to keep the lights on, thanks! 🙂


Conclusion

While Stratocaster dimensions might look like plain old numbers to some people, true guitarists know how much impact they can have on a guitar’s playability and tone. 

With this in mind, your next step is to get out there and start testing some different Fender models


FAQs

What Are The Standard Dimensions Of A Fender Stratocaster?

  • Stratocaster Length: 38.9 inches
  • Stratocaster Width: 12.75 inches
  • Stratocaster Thickness: 1.75 inches
  • Stratocaster Scale Length: 25.5 inches
  • Stratocaster Weight: 7.5 pounds

Are All Stratocaster Models The Same Size?

Nope! Several variations of Stratocasters exist with different dimensions, including unique scale lengths, body sizes, neck profiles, and more.

Can I Customize The Dimensions Of A Stratocaster?

Depending on the level of modification you’re willing to get into, there are many things you can customize on a Fender Stratocaster that could impact its dimensions, including the neck, the pickups, and the pickguard.

How Big Is A Stratocaster Compared To A Telecaster?

Fender Stratocasters and Telecasters are almost the same in size. However, because they have different body contours, electronics, and hardware setups, some more nuanced dimensions can change, such as the body thickness, fretboard radius, etc.

How Long Is A Short-Scale Stratocaster?

Short-scale Stratocasters have a 24” scale length, making them a bit more comfortable for smaller players than your standard full-size Stratocaster body.

What Is The Bridge Dimension On A Stratocaster?

Though the bridge dimensions of a standard Strat bridge can vary, your traditional six-saddle bridge will have the following dimensions:

  • Bridge Plate Length: 3.9 inches
  • Bridge Plate Width: 3.28 inches
  • Saddle Width: 0.39 inches

How High Should Pickups Be On A Strat?

While the way in which you set your Strat pickup height will depend on how you want your guitar to sound and how much output you want from it, here are a few standard Stratocaster pickup heights to get you started:

  • Bridge Plate Length: 3.9 inches
  • Bridge Plate Width: 3.28 inches
  • Saddle Width: 0.39 inches

Is Strat Easier To Play Than Telecaster?

Some people feel that Strats are easier to play because of better access to high notes. Others argue that Telecasters are easier to play because the pickup configuration is less complicated.

Tyler Connaghan

Tyler Connaghan is a guitarist, singer, producer, composer & engineer based in Los Angeles, California. Tyler has been playing the guitar since 2007. In between writing for guitar publications, he produces music for film and television. His favorite axe is his custom Pelham Blue Fender Stratocaster. You can connect with Tyler on LinkedIn or just email him.
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